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Pantry

A different kind of sinigang

There's nothing like a bowl of hot, freshly cooked sinigang on a cold rainy day. More so if it's teeming with tender, slow-roasted meat. Read more

Healthful eating three ways

A hot new trio of cookbooks can help those with diabetes and the people who care about them enjoy delicious, nutritious dishes together. Read more

A refreshing citrussy drink

Here's an interesting calamansi juice with a ginger-y twist. Read more

Adobo with a foreign twist

The Filipino national dish, Adobo, is given a 'gourmet' twist by Diamond Hotel's executive chef Marko Rankel. Read more

Juicy fall-off-the-bone ribs

Luscious, juicy and melt-in-the-mouth tender to the bite... everybody loves baby back ribs. Now you can try making your own. Read more

A different kind of spring roll

If you love salmon and you love spring rolls, then you'd love this Salmon Puri Puri Salad because it combines both. Read more

Confetti couscous salad

This smart salad offers a new twist on a popular food. Read more

Refreshing warm salad

Yes, beef and veggies do go very well together. This Warm Thai Beef Salad is as refreshing and light as it can get. Find the recipe in Pantry. Read more

Fresh native salad for summer

Summer's the perfect time to enjoy a fresh salad, such as this ensaladang lato, whose recipe resident foodie Dolly Dy-Zulueta shares in Pantry. Read more

A light and nutritious pasta dish for Lent

Looking for a meatless dish that's not only delicious but light, healthy and nutritious as well? Resident foodie Dolly Dy-Zulueta suggests crabstick and malunggay pasta. Read more

Lenten recipes

The Lenten season brings challenges to make no-meat meals as appetizing and flavorful. Thankfully, Century Tuna and nutritionist to the stars Nadine Tengco came up with delectable and filling Lent-friendly recipes for the aspiring Superbods. Read more

View all Pantry stories.


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December 13, 2011

Paksing Demonyu (Paksiw ng Demonyo)

Fans of Kapampangan cooking will readily recognize the name Lillian Borromeo. Her kitchen in the family's ancestral home in the town of Mexico in Pampanga province, Philippines has hosted many foreign and local tourists eager to see and savor her famous cooking methods which are derived from generations of Kapampangan cooks.

This year, with the help of the Holy Angel University's Center for Kapampangan Studies, Borromeo published her book of traditional home-cooking recipes of the Pampanga province. Entitled Atching Lillian's Heirloom Recipes, the book took seven years to make because Borromeo took time to interview and cajole secret recipes out of reluctant cooks, as well as go through her own family's recipes. The result is a treasure trove of Kapampangan-style stews, soups, and sweets, most only passed down through stories and fond reminiscences of old Kapampangan kitchens.

One of these popular and oddly named recipes in the book is called Paksing Demonyu, or Paksiw ng Demonyo. The name is derived from an old story wherein a farmer brings home fish for his wife to turn into paksiw (fish simmered in vinegar, water and vegetables). When the wife leaves the kitchen to set up the table, the devil sneaks in and steals the fish from the stew, leaving only the vegetables and the soup. Not realizing what had happened, the wife proceeds to serve the dish to her husband. The husband eats the dish, likes it, and—to the devil's consternation—declares it to be the best one she has cooked for him.

Luckily for the rest of us, the recipe—and its devilish name—has survived and is now outlined below.
PAKSING DEMONYU

Paksing Demonyu

Ingredients

200 grams eggplant

200 grams kangkong (water spinach)

200 grams ampalaya (bitter gourd)

1 cup water

1 cup brown sugar

3/4 cup vinegar

1 tbsp salt

50 grams larang pamaksi (siling pari, or Spanish pepper)

50 grams sliced sibuyas Tagalog (red onion)

25 grams sliced ginger

25 grams garlic

Procedure

1. Boil mixture of liquid and spice ingredients except for the eggplant, kangkong and ampalaya.

2. Put vegetables in boiling mixture, then cook for two minutes.

3. Correct seasoning to taste.

Atching Lillian's Heirloom Recipes is available at the Holy Angel University's Center for Kapampangan Studies in Angeles City, Pampanga; Lillian Borromeo's in Mexico, Pampanga ; Solidaridad Bookshop in Ermita, tel. (632) 254-1086; Museum of the Filipino People in Rizal Park (Luneta) Manila; Tradewinds Centre in the Silahis Arts & Artifacts store in Intramuros ; and the Filipinas Heritage Library in Makati.




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